THE CRADLE OF MANKIND; EAST AFRICA

THE CRADLE OF MANKIND

Show me the Beginning of me
Show me my birth
Show me the earth’s womb that carried me
The fluid water valleys that surrounded me
The chords whose strong roots fed and nurtured me
The round shelter that protected me from marauding creatures
The maternal nature that gave me strength to brace life
Show me the birth of my beginning
Show me the beginning of my birth

I. I call him our own

We found him in the thirsty, hot, desert
In July just as the sand storm carpeted him
In its fast embrace that left him chocked
Dusty and buried from the sun’s glaring eyes
Buried under the sands of time.

We knew he was there,
For our hearts called out to him
Toumai, Toumai, Toumai

Our own he was, the hope of our lives
The very first of our kind lay hidden for half eternity
Yet his hands had touched our lives
He had stretched his hand across years
He had stretched his heels across vast lands
He reached out and touched our vein outlines
Every lineage, every close and distant relative
Distant relations that went astray
Chimping, chirping, aping into new territories
In fours, in twos, black white and yellow.

We found him,
We found you Toumai,
We called out your name across the ages,
And you rose from the sands,
After what seemed like 7days in a million nights,
You rose,
You who was our own kind,
An ancestor to call our own,
Our hope in this life,
Toumai.

II. Out of Africa

They said you would come from a Garden
For writings on pages of history said so
Created on the sixth day, walking upright
In a reflection of the masters own image
When Darwin saw your coming
From where all life began, the Eden
Like Mugo wa Kibiru with visions of smoking snakes
Darwin saw your strides across Africa
50 years later, your remnants could be traced
From the south of Africa
You who was then Africanus, the southern Ape
Became the linkage to our future ancestry
Your family of robustus vindicated that indeed
You were not just some myth, fable or fairy tale
You had existed in the south.
Out of Africa you came

III. Rising of the Son

Like the sun
You had rose
On a cold night full of mist, darkness of uncertainty
Of what the new day held
Your eastern sons rose to the Leakey
The Boisei son’s rays shone
The Afarensis light shone
Into the past
They lit the path that span 2.9million wide
And 3.6 million years long
Bringing forth to light our own
The homo genus, Africa’s own

IV. Lucy’s Kind

They called you Lucy
Lucy’s Kind
Did Lucy truly reflect your eastern origin?
From the land reigned by Makeda
Or your African Attributes?
That flowed in your stride
Your thick jaws that held your strong teeth?
Did Lucy Portray
Your descendant’s maybe?
Whose firm limbs grasped, gathered, climbed and gripped?
Wild berries, fruits and branches,
On fours, walking
Your forerunners, perhaps?
On twos evolving to.
You were, the DIkika Girl.

V. The story without an end

Every day, year after year
We find traces of our kind
Darwin, Yohannes, Manthi
They all seek your beginning
They all search for the link,
That link,
That bond
That ties our kind with your kind
But the life’s puzzle is far from complete
The time, space and evolution enigma
Conceals the end of our story
The human story
Her story, His- Story
Our history.
Our story has just begun.

An initiative for ‘Anamoro Project’

Telling our story of evolution

N.W

kenyanpoet@gmail.com

Sept. 2007

This poem should not be reprinted, copied or divulged to third parties without the explicit permission from the Author – All rights reserved©

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